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Recommended Reading



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#1 Silver

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 05:01 PM

Just give people some ideas of what they should read. i'll go first. 

 

-Little Brother

 by Cory Doctrow

 This is a great story about a a boy who tries to overthrow a police state. 

Spoiler

-Eragon series 

 Christopher Paolini

 This a epic story of a Eragon a young adult and his dragon Saphira as they fight against the evil emperor. 

Spoiler

-Fablehaven series

 Brandon Mull 

 Two kids and there fight to save the mythical creatures of the world. 

Spoiler

-Michael Vey: The Prisoner of Cell 25

 Richard Paul Evans 

 Micheal has powers and he doesn't know the consequences of them.

Spoiler

-Ready Player One

 Ernest Cline 

 When a prize of over 100 billion come with winning a ridiculously hard contest crazy things happen. 

Spoiler





#2 Starfox64x

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 06:00 AM

Hm... well... The only book i've read lately is Hyrule Historia... before that a lot of Manga, so... i dont know if you'd consider that somethign that counts...

 

I do have some though...

 

Fehrenheit 451

 

Very intriguing book where 'fire fighters' actually just burn books because they're outlawed... a fireman comes across some books, readst them, finds them good and treis to convince the people around him that they're good...boy it's been a while, i should pick this up again...

 

And uh...

 

um...

 

okay, 1 book on my list...

 

I do have a short list of books i WOULDN'T recomend...

 

The Red Pony:

 

I dont remember much from this book OTHEr than a horrifying scene that i was forced to read through... I'll give you the sparknotes version of that bit... warning, graphic...

 

Spoiler

 

Effing terrifying and traumatic for an elementary school child to read...

 

Kite Runner

 

After the rape scene in the first twenty pages of reading and my teacher getting giddy and asking us how we were liking the books... i quickly decided i had no desire to read this anymore...

 

Lord of the Flies

 

2nd or 3rd chapter... the author used an entire paragraph to describe how pig poo felt between a kids toes.... a paragraph... and a good sized one two, not one of those 'Ugh, i need a minimum of 4 sentences to count as a paragraph" things...  lots of uneeded detail about boys running around murdering each other... like, BOY boys... kids... not even teens... duh fudge...

 

Wuthering Heights.

 

It's suppose to be a romance spanning many years... but i coulldnt get involved in any of the characters or cared about anything really... Just dull...

 

dont get me wrong, i love reading and i love stories... but.... public education never really chose the best books in my opinion...





#3 SonicRainboomGirl

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 07:29 AM

Ready Player One, the Eragon Series, and Little Brother are all awesome.

 

I totally recommend the Warriors Series. It's simply amazing. It is so well written, and it is simply a masterpiece.

 

(by the warriors series, I mean Into the Wild--The Darkest Hour. I don't expect anyone to read beyond that except nerdy old me!)

 

And, of course, get your Oscar Wilde on! The Picture of Dorian Gray is phenomenal! Everybody go buy yourselves a copy and bathe in the lavish language of Wilde. Dooo it!





#4 Silver

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 11:03 PM

Fehrenheit 451

 

Lord of the Flies

 

2nd or 3rd chapter... the author used an entire paragraph to describe how pig poo felt between a kids toes.... a paragraph... and a good sized one two, not one of those 'Ugh, i need a minimum of 4 sentences to count as a paragraph" things...  lots of uneeded detail about boys running around murdering each other... like, BOY boys... kids... not even teens... duh fudge...

 

 

I want to read Fehrenheit 45. and I really like lord of the flies except when

Spoiler





#5 Lili

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 11:17 PM

-Storm Front

Jim Butcher

A supernatural detective novel about a string of murders usually caused by hearts exploding via magic. Very good.

 

-House of Leaves

Mark Z. Danielewski

It's hard to describe. It's the weirdest book I've ever read. If you're into ergodic literature and feeling agoraphobic, you'll love it.

 

-The Three Weissmanns of Westport

Cathleen Schine

The tale of a mother and her two middle-aged daughters after her hard divorce, where afterwards they move into a small shack in a cozy little beachtown.





#6 Templar_Frost

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 12:53 AM

Read Haunted

 

READ IT READ IT READ IT READ IT READ IT

 

 

 

Don't read it.





#7 Dunes

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 05:46 AM

If you're into urban, modern-day fantasy, read Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman. He's hardly an obscure author or anything, but it is my favorite book of his and may be one of my favorite fiction books period. He creates a world based on abandoned bits of the London underground and other places that only the ignored/invisible dredges of society would go. Richard Mayhew helps an injured girl, who's part of that world, and in doing so he becomes a part of it, so they both spend much of the book trying to evade mythological murderers, while Richard just tries to get back to his old life. Fun fact! It was a BBC miniseries first, and Gaiman wrote a book based on it later.

 

If you're into regular fantasy, but think it has a tendency to be stuffy and/or full of ridiculous tropes, read... pretty much anything in the Terry Pratchett's discworld series. It's fantasy satire and pretty funny, but he creates engaging characters and storylines in the process. You can pretty much pick up any book and figure out what's going on, but starting with The Colour of Magic, Equal Rites, Mort, or Guards Guards! is a safe bet as each one introduces a distinct set of characters. (There are ton of them.)

 

For nonfiction, I found Proofiness by Charles Seife pretty interesting. It's about ways people can use numbers that may be true, and use them in every dishonest way imaginable. 

 

If you're interested in history, Assassination Vacation by Sarah Vowell is a good read (as are her other books). I find a lot of history books hard to get through because the tone is, well, boring, but her style of writing is really accessible. 

 

It's a comic, but I'd highly recommend Maus by Art Spiegelman if you're interested in personal stories about Jewish life in Germany during WWII and you are also interested in being really depressed for a while

 

Also, if you like supernatural/werewolfy fiction but hate all the YA "supernatural romance" shlock that's everywhere these days, Bitten by Kelley Armstrong is good. The only female werewolf has to go back to her estranged pack (including the guy who bit her) and track down a pack of murderers. (It does get a bit racy and a bit, well, murder-y. Fair warning.) The author has written more in the series, but I haven't read any of it yet.



#8 MyLittlePonyTales

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 08:50 PM

The Redwall series by Brian Jacques. 'nuff said.



#9 weesh

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 01:51 AM

Band of Brothers is becoming one of my favorite books by one of my favorite authors.  Only half way through...

Stephen Ambrose's war books are wonderful because they dive into the personal lives and thoughts of the soldiers.  He went so far as to actually talk to those that were still alive as part of his research.  

 

 

The Redwall series by Brian Jacques. 'nuff said.

Eh, can you explain why you liked them?

I found them to be repetitive and unsatisfying.  This from a kid who would go on to read the first 65 hardy boys books before discovering that they were repetitive.  





#10 MyLittlePonyTales

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 02:50 AM

Oh man, I ate those books up! I burned through the Redwall series. I guess it's because I've king of always liked fantasy and animals, so they're kind of my thing. I mean, there's action, adventure, romance, mystery, and hey, author isn't afraid to kill off characters. It's a set of history books, detailing through the history of the city of Redwall and the surrounding kingdoms, their struggles through wars, and the secrets hidden within its walls by those long past. It's a friggin' fantastic and well written series, in my opinion. Maybe it seems repetitive, but history repeats itself, don't you know? :P The characters also have different cultures based on their species, and the food that's described during the banquets sounds delicious (so much so that one time my step-dad helped me cook a Redwall themed meal for my family!). So yeah, I guess it's just kind of my personal thing, but I think most people would like it.



#11 Lili

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 03:11 PM

hey, author isn't afraid to kill off characters

XtGpRS8.jpg





#12 Silver

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 03:26 PM

So I still read so ill throw out some more books that i've read lately.

Maze runner. An interesting story with a great amount of originality. Although surprisingly graphic the author makes it meaningful and well placed.

Life of pi. If you have not see the movie or read the book I suggest you read it. (And the book is better.)



#13 weesh

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 03:57 PM

I just read "outliers" and "tipping point" by Malcolm Gladwell.  Both are excellent (NYT #1 best sellers), and it is hard to suggest one over the other.

Both are about how people think success works, and how it actually works.  They are broadly written, but feels deep because each example is portrayed via a case study, and these stories are quite interesting.

 

 

 

 

Maze runner. An interesting story with a great amount of originality. Although surprisingly graphic the author makes it meaningful and well placed.

 

What's it about?





#14 Silver

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 05:34 PM

A boy finds himself in a large clearing and has no memory of what his life was berorehand. Outside the clearing is a maze. The maze changes every night and is filled with horrible creatures called greivers. They (Him and the other boys who are stuck there) are trying to find an
exit but have been unsuccessful for two years.



#15 NastyMann

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 05:45 PM

I want to read Fehrenheit 45. and I really like lord of the flies except when

Spoiler

Spoiler

 

I recommend The Little Prince. It's not too long of a story, but it's filled to the brim with philosophy and emotion. It's just seriously really amazing.





#16 Silver

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 05:47 PM

Sound interesting, what's it about exactly,?



#17 NastyMann

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 06:03 PM

It's essentially about a man (the narrator) who, while on his aeroplane, crashes into the desert. There, he meets a Little Prince, who is from a distant planet (that is apparently actually an asteroid). The Little Prince tells him of how he came here, and the people he met, and eventually makes his escape from this planet once again

 

It's not so much plot-driven, as it is somewhat of a children's book, but the real beauty in it is the allegorical aspects, and the ideas it presents to the reader. It's a lot more of a literary book, and many people find it boring which is understandable, but it was all golden to me and I think everyone should read it. 





#18 Silver

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 06:09 PM

Will read. Have you read the giver?



#19 NastyMann

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 06:13 PM

No, I don't believe I have. What's it about? (Unless it was already mentioned and I missed it. In which case, my apologies.)





#20 Silver

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 06:26 PM

It's about, well its hard to explain. Look it up because I cant remember how it started. Sorry.







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